Array and Display

JEWELRY DISPLAYS, RETAIL FIXTURES and CRAFT SHOW DISPLAYS

TOUR OUR WORKSHOP

The WorkshopMelissa HathcockComment
Tour the Array and Display workshop where the jewelry displays are made.  Handcrafted by ArrayandDisplay.com

An old, drafty building behind our farmhouse is where all the magic happens these days.  When we bought the farmhouse, the workshop was nearly falling down.  Not only that, it was full of abandoned televisions from the 70's.  Why?  Because the owners had a TV repair shop in the backyard.  And next to the TV repair shop?  A one-chair "hair salon".   The previous owners were part of what was once a thriving tiny village that is now abandoned, nameless and forgotten with hints of the past buried in burn piles and stacked behind trees.

Here's a peek inside our current workshop, sans electricity and lit by a power cord attached to a generator because all the power lines to the shop are missing (and expensive, hence the power cord).  The pile of sawdust in the back?  A daily occurrence.

Clinton doing what he does best; making beautiful things with a giant, vintage saw that we got on C's List.  Her name is Bertha and she's a beast!

Clinton doing what he does best; making beautiful things with a giant, vintage saw that we got on C's List.  Her name is Bertha and she's a beast!

But before we go further, I want to step back and show you where it all started.  If you've read  Our Story, you know that we got our start under an old Oak tree in our backyard a little over 2 years ago when we lived in Fort Worth, TX (2014).  The branch over our logo represents the branch on the bottom right of the tree in this photo - where it all started.  I know, "awww".

The old Oak tree in our backyard in Fort Worth where Array and Display got it's start.  

The old Oak tree in our backyard in Fort Worth where Array and Display got it's start.  

We are probably the only small business to have started under a TREE and not a garage or a dorm room.  And that tin shed?  Our first workshop.  No, really.  Because we didn't anticipate rain (stop laughing).  So Clinton moved a few pieces of machinery inside the tin shed and ran an extension cord to the back of the house when he needed to create orders (while bent over).  At this point in our business, I stained pieces on wax paper on the kitchen counter.

We outgrew this tin shed quickly and somehow, between creating products and working a day job, he managed to build a bigger workshop in our backyard (that was tall enough for him to stand in!).  We spent weekends hunting for pallets, fencing and reclaimed wood to build his workshop.

Clinton building a new workshop for Array and Display in our backyard in Fort Worth, TX, using reclaimed pallets and fencing.

Clinton building a new workshop for Array and Display in our backyard in Fort Worth, TX, using reclaimed pallets and fencing.

By the time he had this workshop built, we had sold all of our living room furniture and moved our studio into the living room.  Fold-out tables and rolling chairs replaced the cushy leather sofa, coffe table, rugs and big screen TV.  This is when shit got real for us.  

This is the outcome of all the piles of reclaimed wood in the backyard.  Isn't it precious? The door on the left is a sliding barn door and the "windows" are actually glass from picture frames we found at Goodwill for $1 each.  The only thing new on this workshop is the tin roof and accents (we could not find old tin that wasn't full of holes and rusty).

The second workshop for Array and Display built singled handedly by Clinton our of reclaimed wood.

The second workshop for Array and Display built singled handedly by Clinton our of reclaimed wood.

And a shot from the inside of him hard at work.  It took him 3 months to build this and, during that time, we started getting wholesale customers (Harley Davidson, Tom's) which meant we had almost outgrown it before he could move in!  We made-do for 3 more months then expanded in a big way when we bought a farmhouse and some land South of Dallas in a town that no longer exists (and can't be found on GPS).

A shot of the inside of his new workshop (that we out grew 3 months later)

A shot of the inside of his new workshop (that we out grew 3 months later)

He now works out of the old tin shop behind our farmhouse which is about 900sf, around 4-5 times larger that the cutie building pictured above. 

Here's a peek at some of the tools he uses to create jewelry displays, and most everything inside our farmhouse.

Yes, we have a company banner inside the workshop.  A once tried and failed remnant of a craft market we attended that was the epitome of misery and bad choices.  During the 8 hours we were there, we sold nothing in person, but had 14 sales on Etsy.  Lesson learned.

Yes, we have a company banner inside the workshop.  A once tried and failed remnant of a craft market we attended that was the epitome of misery and bad choices.  During the 8 hours we were there, we sold nothing in person, but had 14 sales on Etsy.  Lesson learned.

And not to be overlooked, our resident "Quality Control Manager" Hank, our stray donkey (he adopted us Christmas 2015 and wouldn't leave - another story).  He visits the workshop occasionally to make sure everything meets his strict expectations (meaning: he sniffs it). Ah, farm life.

The Array and Display Workshop with Hank the Stray donkey.

The workshop is in no way impressive, but it is functional and serves our purpose for now.  We have plans to expand again in 2018 but for now, we are making do until we finish renovating our 1910 farmhouse (almost finished!).

Thank you for spending time in our space and getting to know the people (and donkey) behind the small business. 

Until next time, my friends!

OUR STORY

The WorkshopMelissa HathcockComment
The Story of how a small, handcrafted business, ArrayandDisplay.com, was launched from a single request.

Clinton and I are thrilled to have a shiny new website!  After selling on another (very crowded) platform for almost 3 years, we took the leap and started our own website to include a blog and a newsletter so we could have control over how we connect with our customers as well as allow them to get to know the people and the story behind the logo.

So to begin at the beginning: Array and Display got its start under the branch of an old Oak tree in our backyard in Fort Worth, TX in July, 2014.  I was a jewelry designer at the time (still am, but no time currently) and I needed a few displays for a show, but I couldn't find any that weren't cheaply made.  So I asked Clinton if maybe he could make a couple of stands, and, being the always eager to please darling that he is, he obliged.  On a whim, I thought I would try listing them on Etsy just to see what would happen. What happened was all the stands sold in a week. We were beyond giddy.  We made more displays.  The next week we received an order for over $500 in displays (in the UK!  We went international!! Squee!) andI nearly fainted!  We had apparently tapped a niche without having done any research on our product.  

And that's how it started.  

The Oak tree where Array and Display got it's start.  The bottom branch is now our logo!

The Oak tree where Array and Display got it's start.  The bottom branch is now our logo!

Clinton worked on a sawhorse under the shade of the old oak tree and orders came rolling in from all over the world faster than we could make them.  We quit our jobs, moved to the country and spend our days making jewelry displays (among other things) that help jewelry designers show their creations in the best possible light.  If only I had time to be a jewelry designer again so I could use my own displays!  Irony.  Here is part of a collection I created for a runway fashion show in Dallas. I have a thing for statement jewelry, to say the least.

High fashion statement jewelry handcrafted by Melissa of Array and Display.com

We have (virtually) met so many lovely people through our small business that we feel like we have a huge extended family stretching around the world.  They send us photos of our product babies and ask for updates on the remodel of our 1910 Texas farmhouse (we're doing it OURSELVES) - the farmhouse and land we bought in 2015 so we could have room to expand our business and live simpler lives way out in the country.

Turquoise and Co jewelry on our necklace displays and earring display.

Turquoise and Co jewelry on our necklace displays and earring display.

It sounds daring and romantic to give up everything and start a simpler life, no?  Ignorant is probably a better description for those 2 awestruck people who stumbled upon a crumbly old 2 story farmhouse in the middle of nowhere Texas (I miss you, Target and cell phone service!) on a farm that not even GPS can find.  Have you ever had to give directions to a UPS driver? 

Mama cow and twins.  

Mama cow and twins.  

When we aren't in the workshop creating orders or in the studio painting/staining/shipping them, we are working on the farmhouse.  Here's a before and after of my kitchen.  I KNOW!!  Mouth hanging open, right?  

The first room we remodeled in our 1910 farmhouse was the kitchen.  Because, you know, food.  Clinton did this all by himself!

The first room we remodeled in our 1910 farmhouse was the kitchen.  Because, you know, food.  Clinton did this all by himself!

It seems every waking moment of our days is spent creating things, and we couldn't be happier.

Hopefully, you know a bit more about us.  We are thrilled and thankful to be living our dream life and we have our customers to thank for every goal we have achieved and surpassed.  We wouldn't have been successful without you!

XOXO,